Acute elbow pain

Acute elbow pain is pain in the elbow which comes on suddenly. The athlete is likely to know the exact point in time when the injury occurred. Chronic or long term elbow injuries can be classed as acute if they flare up or are acutely painful such as an acute episode of golfers elbow. Acute elbow pain can be due to an olecranon bursitis where there is inflammation or a fracture of either the radius or ulnar.

Soft tissue injuries to the muscles or acute tendonpathies can also cause sudden elbow pain. Injuries with this symptom are listed below:
  • Tennis Elbow

    Tennis Elbow

    Tennis Elbow is a general term used to describe pain on the outside of the elbow. The most common causes is inflammation or degeneration of the tendon of the wrist extensor muscles as they insert into the elbow. It is also known as lateral epicondylitis or extensor tendinopathy.

  • Ulna Nerve Contusion

    Ulna Nerve Contusion

    The ulnar nerve runs down the inside of the elbow. If you knock the inside of the elbow you can get a numbness or buzzing down the forearm into the forth and fifth fingers (hitting your funny bone). It is the ulnar nerve that is being hit when this happens.

  • Elbow Bursitis - Students Elbow

    Elbow Bursitis

    Elbow bursitis also known as Students elbow or Olecranon bursitis is the inflammation and swelling of the bursa which protects the bone at the back of the elbow.

  • Olecranon Fracture

    Olecranon Fracture

    The olecranon process the the large bony prominence at the back of the elbow on the ulna forearm bone. It is usually fractured from a direct impact or fall onto a bent elbow.

  • Broken Elbow

    Broken Elbow

    An elbow fracture is a break in one of the bones which form the elbow joint. There are three bones which could be broken. These are the Humerus (upper arm bone), Ulna and Radius (two forearm bones).

  • Dislocated Elbow

    Dislocated Elbow

    Elbow dislocations are the second most common dislocations in adults, behind shoulder dislocations. The elbow is a very stable joint and so it requires a lot of force to dislocate it.

  • Medial Elbow Ligament Sprain

    Medial Elbow Ligament Sprain

    The medial collateral (MCL) ligament of the elbow is situated on the inner elbow and helps to provide stability to the joint. Damage to this ligament can occur through an impact injury or an accident or from repetitive overuse, for example throwing with poor technique.

  • Elbow Avulsion Fracture

    Avulsion fracture of the medial epiconyle is when the tendon comes away from the bone and can take part of the bone with it.

  • Biceps Tendon Strain

    Biceps tendon strain at its insertion on the inside or front of the elbow is also rare but has been known in weight lifting and other strength type sports and activities. A tear of the tendon may follow a period of biceps tendinitis that is not treated and managed correctly.

  • Elbow Hyperextension

    Elbow Hyperextension

    An elbow hyperextension injury occurs when the elbow is bent back the wrong way. This over-straightening causes damage to the ligaments and structures of the elbow.

  • Lateral Elbow Pain

    Tennis Elbow or llateral epicondylitis is probably the most commonly used term for describing pain on the outside of the elbow. However, there are a number of other causes of lateral elbow pain which should be considered. Other potential causes of pain on the outside of the elbow include referred pain, radial tunnel syndrome, synovitis, bursitis and osteochondritis dissecan.

  • Medial Elbow Pain

    Medial elbow is pain on the inside of the elbow. It usually comes on gradually through overuse but can also be an acute injury, especially when throwing. Golfer's elbow or throwers elbow is probably the most common name given to pain on the inside of the elbow and refers to inflammation or degeneration of the flexor tendon. Other causes include sprains (ligament tears), nerve compression, avulsion fractures apohysitis and pain referred from the upper back or shoulder.