Chronic elbow pain

Chronic elbow pain develops gradually over time. The athlete is unlikely to be able to pinpoint the exact time the injury occurred. Injuries can develop following an acute injury, which failed to heal properly. They are most common are golfers or tennis elbow where there is an injury to either the inside (medial) or outside (lateral) of the muscles / tendons that make your wrist flex or extend causing epicondylitis. This is where the group of flexor or extensor muscles inserts to the elbow and are common with sports requiring lifting or rackets and sticks.

Chronic elbow pain can also be due to the nerves where carpal tunnel and cubital tunnel syndromes occur due to compression or entrapment. Overuse and repetitive injuries can be from many sports or hobbies and are commonplace at the elbow due to loading issues. Injuries and conditions that cause this symptom are listed below:
  • Tennis Elbow

    Tennis Elbow

    Tennis Elbow is a general term used to describe pain on the outside of the elbow. The most common causes is inflammation or degeneration of the tendon of the wrist extensor muscles as they insert into the elbow. It is also known as lateral epicondylitis or extensor tendinopathy.

  • Radial Tunnel Syndrome

    Radial Tunnel Syndrome

    Radial tunnel syndrome or radial nerve entrapment as it is sometimes called is when the radial nerve gets compressed or restricted in the tunnel it passes through.

  • Golfers Elbow

    Golfers Elbow

    Golfers elbow or medial epicondylitis is an overuse injury similar to tennis elbow (on the outside of the arm) but causing pain on the inside of the elbow instead. It is sometimes known as throwers elbow or little league elbow. We explain the symptoms, causes and treatment to return you back to full fitness in the shortest time.

  • Elbow Bursitis - Students Elbow

    Elbow Bursitis

    Elbow bursitis also known as Students elbow or Olecranon bursitis is the inflammation and swelling of the bursa which protects the end of the ulna bone at the back of the elbow.

  • Triceps Tendon Inflammation

    Triceps Tendon Inflammation

    The triceps tendon at the back of the upper arm inserts into the elbow. Injury can occur to the tendon from sudden impact such as a fall or over use.

  • Biceps Tendonitis

    Biceps Tendonitis

    Biceps tendonitis results in pain and inflammation of the biceps tendon as it inserts into the inside of the elbow.

  • Osteochondritis Dissecans

    Osteochondritis Dissecans is a fragmentation of the cartilage and sometimes the underlying bone within a joint. This is common in adolescents as the ends of the bones are not yet fully hardened.

  • Synovitis of the Elbow Joint

    Elbow Synovitis

    Synovitis of the elbow joint is inflammation of the synovial membrane which surrounds the joint becomes inflamed.

  • Radiohumeral Bursitis

    Radiohumeral bursitis can also give similar symptoms to tennis elbow. This is inflammation of a bursa or small sack of fluid which sits between the tendon and the bone to help lubricate it.

  • Elbow Apophysitis

    Apohysitis is a condition affecting children and adolescents and is a crumbling of the bone at the point the tendon attaches to. It is similar to apohysitis in the knee (Osgood schlatters disease) or at the back of the heel (Severs' diease). Apohysitis is usually something children will grow out of by the age of 16 or 17 although the condition does need to be managed properly with plenty of rest. Applying ice or cold therapy can help reduce pain and inflammation.

  • Lateral Elbow Pain

    The most common term for pain on the outside of the elbow is Tennis Elbow (Llateral Epicondylitis). However there are a number of other causes of lateral elbow pain which should be considered as well as acute elbow injuries such as ligament sprains and fractures. Other potential causes of pain on the outside of the elbow include referred pain, radial tunnel syndrome, synovitis, bursitis and osteochondritis dissecans.

  • Medial Elbow Pain

    Medial elbow is pain on the inside of the elbow. It usually comes on gradually through overuse but can also be an acute injury, especially when throwing. Golfer's elbow or throwers elbow is probably the most common name given to pain on the inside of the elbow and refers to inflammation or degeneration of the flexor tendon. Other causes include sprains (ligament tears), nerve compression, avulsion fractures apohysitis and pain referred from the upper back or shoulder.