Inside elbow pain

Pain on the inside of the elbow or medial side can be referred from the neck (cervical spine) or can be due to the surrounding soft tissue or bone. Inside elbow pain can be due to fracture or bone bruises of the ulnar or humerus. The medial collateral ligament or annular ligament can also be injured at the elbow causing inside elbow pain.

The most common cause of inside elbow pain is golfers elbow although not restricted to just golfers. This is where the tendon becomes inflamed at the medial attachment and can be acute or chronic and may have started with either weakness of the flexor muscles or tightness through a loading issue. Injuries and conditions that cause this symptom are listed below:
  • Golfer's Elbow

    Golfers Elbow

    Golfer's elbow or medial epicondylitis is an overuse injury similar to tennis elbow (on the outside of the arm) but causing pain on the inside of the elbow instead. The elbow injury usually comes on gradually over a period of time, rather than eing an acute pain. It is sometimes known as thrower's elbow or little league elbow. We explain the symptoms, causes, and treatment to return you back to full fitness in the shortest time.

  • Ulna Nerve Contusion

    Ulna Nerve Contusion

    The ulnar nerve runs down the inside of the elbow. If you knock the inside of the elbow, you can hit the ulnar nerve (or funny bone) which causes a numbness or tingling down the forearm into the fourth and fifth fingers. When this nerve becomes trapped or damaged through repetitive strain or a direct impact, it creates this sensation and can cause elbow pain.

  • Medial Elbow Ligament Sprain

    Medial Elbow Ligament Sprain

    The medial collateral (MCL) ligament of the elbow is situated on the inner elbow and helps to provide stability to the joint. Damage to this ligament can occur from an impact injury or from repetitive oversuse, for example throwing with poor technique. Symptoms can include inside elbow pain and tenderness, read below for more information on the symptoms, causes and treatments.

  • Elbow Avulsion Fracture

    Avulsion fracture of the medial epicondyle is when the tendon comes away from the bone and can take part of the bone with it. This elbow injury is more common in children with symptoms similar to a sprain. These can include elbow pain, swelling and reduced ability to move the arm. Read more on avulsion fractures, their symptoms and how to treat them.

  • Elbow Apophysitis

    Apophysitis is a condition affecting children and adolescents and is a crumbling of the bone at the point the tendon attaches to. It is similar to apophysitis in the knee (Osgood Schlatter disease) or at the back of the heel (Severs' disease). Apophysitis is usually something children will grow out of by the age of 16 or 17 although the condition does need to be managed properly with plenty of rest. Applying ice or cold therapy can help reduce pain and inflammation.

  • Biceps Tendon Strain

    Biceps tendon strain at its insertion on the inside or front of the elbow is rare but has been known in weightlifting and other strength type sports and activities. A tear of the tendon may follow a period of biceps tendinitis that is not treated and managed correctly.

  • Lateral Elbow Pain

    The most common term for pain on the outside of the elbow is Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis). However, there are a number of other causes of lateral elbow pain which should be considered as well as acute elbow injuries such as ligament sprains and fractures. Other potential causes of pain on the outside of the elbow include referred pain, radial tunnel syndrome, synovitis, bursitis and osteochondritis dissecans.

  • Medial Elbow Pain

    A medial elbow is a pain on the inside of the elbow. It usually comes on gradually through overuse but can also be an acute injury, especially when throwing. Golfer's elbow or throwers elbow is probably the most common name given to pain on the inside of the elbow and refers to inflammation or degeneration of the flexor tendon. Other causes include sprains (ligament tears), nerve compression, avulsion fractures apophysitis and pain referred from the upper back or shoulder.