Weakness or pain gripping

Pain in or on the elbow when gripping things such as a screwdriver, door handle or holding a bag can be acute or chronic. Pain on gripping is usually associated with a flexor or extensor muscle issue or tendonopathy and this can be from overuse or a repetitive strain injury (RSI). Pain on gripping can indicate an epicondylitis problem and can also be associated with inflammation.

Weakness can be created due to nerve damage or a disc injury from the neck. Also fatigue or disuse will also create weakness whilst gripping. Injuries and conditions that cause this symptom are listed below:
  • Tennis Elbow

    Tennis Elbow

    Tennis Elbow is a general term used to describe outer elbow pain. The most common causes are inflammation or degeneration of the tendon of the wrist extensor muscles as they insert into the elbow. This can occur from sports, like tennis, and other activities that put stress on the elbow muscles. It is also known as lateral epicondylitis or extensor tendinopathy.

  • Radial Tunnel Syndrome

    Radial Tunnel Syndrome

    Radial tunnel syndrome or radial nerve entrapment as it is sometimes called is when the radial nerve gets compressed or restricted in the tunnel it passes through. This elbow injury is more often caused by rotation of the wrist/lower arm rather than repetitive extension like tennis elbow, but the symptoms of both these injuries can be similar.

  • Golfer's Elbow

    Golfers Elbow

    Golfer's elbow or medial epicondylitis is an overuse injury similar to tennis elbow (on the outside of the arm) but causing pain on the inside of the elbow instead. The elbow injury usually comes on gradually over a period of time, rather than eing an acute pain. It is sometimes known as thrower's elbow or little league elbow. We explain the symptoms, causes, and treatment to return you back to full fitness in the shortest time.

  • Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

    The cubital tunnel is an area on the inner elbow through which the ulnar nerve passes. Cubital tunnel syndrome is caused by compression on the nerve and may also be known as ulnar nerve compression or hitting your 'funny bone'. There are various reasons why the nerve becomes compressed, inlcuding arthritis and repetitive bending of the arms.

  • Median Nerve Injury

    Median nerve injury

    Injury to the median nerve at the elbow may cause symptoms to appear in the forearm, wrist, and hand. Median nerve injuries are often caused by another acute injury which traps or tears the nerve, causing numbness in the forearm. Read more on the symptoms, causes, and treatment of this arm injury.

  • Hook of Hamate Fracture

    Hook of Hamate Fracture

    The wrist contains a number of small bones called carpals. The hamate is a carpal bone on the outside (little finger side) of the wrist. It has a hook-shaped part which protrudes outwards and can under certain circumstances be fractured. With this injury, wrist pain occurs on the side of the little finger and the strength of grip can be reduced.

  • Triquetrum Fracture

    Triquetrum Fracture

    A Triquetral Fracture is a break of the Triquetral bone (sometimes called triquetrum) is one of the eight small carpal bones in the wrist. The Triquetral is the second most commonly fractured carpal, behind the Scaphoid. A sudden, direct impact is the most common cause of this fracture, which causes wrist pain on the side of the little finger. This fracture can also often occur alongside other wrist injuries.

  • Radiohumeral Bursitis

    Radiohumeral bursitis can also give similar symptoms to tennis elbow. This is inflammation of a bursa or small sack of fluid which sits between the tendon and the bone to help lubricate it. This elbow injury can be caused by a direct impact to the joint or arm, with some common symptoms being elbow pain, swelling and restricted movement.

  • Elbow Avulsion Fracture

    Avulsion fracture of the medial epicondyle is when the tendon comes away from the bone and can take part of the bone with it. This elbow injury is more common in children with symptoms similar to a sprain. These can include elbow pain, swelling and reduced ability to move the arm. Read more on avulsion fractures, their symptoms and how to treat them.

  • Elbow Apophysitis

    Apophysitis is a condition affecting children and adolescents and is a crumbling of the bone at the point the tendon attaches to. It is similar to apophysitis in the knee (Osgood Schlatter disease) or at the back of the heel (Severs' disease). Apophysitis is usually something children will grow out of by the age of 16 or 17 although the condition does need to be managed properly with plenty of rest. Applying ice or cold therapy can help reduce pain and inflammation.

  • Lateral Elbow Pain

    The most common term for pain on the outside of the elbow is Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis). However, there are a number of other causes of lateral elbow pain which should be considered as well as acute elbow injuries such as ligament sprains and fractures. Other potential causes of pain on the outside of the elbow include referred pain, radial tunnel syndrome, synovitis, bursitis and osteochondritis dissecans.

  • Medial Elbow Pain

    A medial elbow is a pain on the inside of the elbow. It usually comes on gradually through overuse but can also be an acute injury, especially when throwing. Golfer's elbow or throwers elbow is probably the most common name given to pain on the inside of the elbow and refers to inflammation or degeneration of the flexor tendon. Other causes include sprains (ligament tears), nerve compression, avulsion fractures apophysitis and pain referred from the upper back or shoulder.

  • Forearm Pain

    Pain in the forearm can be sudden onset (acute) and include fractures of either the radius or ulna bones. Gradual onset of pain in the forearm can be caused by nerve impingements or from overuse of the wrist. Or from referred pain higher up the arm or shoulder.

  • Acute Wrist Injuries

    Sudden onset injuries are called acute injuries and are usually caused by a fall onto the hand with an outstretched arm or a forced twisting movement. Damage can occur to the bones, ligaments (connect bone to bone) or tendons (connect muscle to bone) in the wrist. In the first 72 hours, the first aid principles of P.R.I.C.E. are advised including protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If a broken bone (fracture) is suspected, then always seek medical advice immediately.