Gradual onset groin pain

Chronic groin pain or pain in the groin which develops gradually over a period of days, weeks or even months can be due to several different reasons. The athlete is unlikely to be able to pinpoint the exact time the injury occurred. Gradual onset can be from an overuse issue or repetitive inappropriate loading.

A tendonopathy or an enthesitis where the soft tissue meets the bones can cause gradual onset pain in the groin. Injuries with this symptom are listed below:
  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    This injury occurs when there is a fracture at the neck or top of the thigh bone. It is more common in boys aged 11 to 16 years old and occurs gradually over a period of time.

  • Gilmore's Groin

    Gilmore's Groin

    Gilmore's Groin can also be known as a Sportsmans Hernia, athletic pubalgia, slap shot gut and sports hernia. A true Gilmore's Groin has nothing to do with a hernia. We talk to Jerry Gilmore himself who explains all.

  • Groin Inflammation

    Groin Inflammation

    The adductor muscles can become inflamed through overuse or following injury resulting in pain and stiffness at the top of the groin.

  • Labral Tear of the Hip Joint

    Labral Tear - Hip

    A labral tear of the hip joint is a tear to the cartilage lining of the hip joint called the acetabulum which acts as cushioning for the joint.

  • Pelvic Stress Fracture

    Pelvic Stress Fracture

    A pelvic stress fracture is a hairline type fracture in the large pelvis bone. This is due to repetitive impacts or forces, rather than one sudden impact or accident.

  • Hip Bursitis

    Hip Bursitis

    Hip bursitis, also known as Trochanteric bursitis is inflammation of a bursa or small sack of fluid between tendon and bone which prevents friction. The bursa can become inflamed causing pain in the hip.

  • Perthes' Disease

    Perthes' Disease

    Perthes' disease affects children, most commonly aged between four and eight, but can also occasionally occur in younger children and teenagers.

  • Osteitis Pubis

    Osteitis Pubis

    Osteitis pubis, also known now as pubic bone Stress injury results in groin pain originating from the pubic bones at the front of the pelvis.

  • Iliopsoas Bursitis

    Iliopsoas bursitis is inflammation of the bursa which sits under the Iliopsoas muscle at the front of the hip. It is sometimes also called Iliopectineal bursitis.

  • Iliopsoas Inflammation

    The iliopsoas muscle is a strong muscle that lifts the knee up. The muscle or tendon can become inflamed causing pain in the groin.

  • Hip Pain

    Hip pain or hip joint pain often develops gradually and can be from a number of causes. Labral tears and Osteoarthritis are more common, especially in older athletes who have been highly active in their 20's and 30's. Hip pain in children is often diagnosed as Perthe's disease. Here we list the causes of hip pain.

  • Groin Pain

    The most common cause of pain in the groin is an acute groin strain and this is frequently seen in twisting and turning sports such as American football, rugby and soccer.  Whereas acute groin strains can take 2 to 3 weeks to recover, chronic groin injuries can take months if not years to clear up, often because there are several possible causes.