Chronic hip pain

Chronic hip pain is long term pain in the hip, or hip pain, which may have developed gradually. The patient is unlikely to know a specific time when they noticed an injury occur. Chronic hip pain may also develop following an acute or sudden onset hip injury, which has not healed properly. Chronic hip pain can be due to an injury to the bones, soft tissue, cartilage, or ligaments.

  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    This injury occurs when there is a fracture at the neck or top of the thigh bone. It is more common in boys aged 11 to 16 years old and occurs gradually over a period of time.

  • Rectus Femoris Tendon Inflammation

    The rectus femorisis the large quadricep muscle running down the middle of the front of the thigh. Its function is to lift up the knee and straighten the leg.

  • Labral Tear of the Hip Joint

    Labral Tear - Hip

    A labral tear of the hip joint is a tear to the cartilage lining of the hip joint, called the acetabulumm which acts as cushioning for the joint. A tear can cause hip and groin pain and make the joint stiff. This hip injury can be caused by a direct impact or come on gradually through degeneration. Read more on the causes, symptoms and treatment here.

  • Synovitis of the Hip

    Synovitis offen occurs in sports people alongside another hip joint injury. Treating the original cause or co-existing condition is key to recovering from hip synovitis. Symptoms include difficulty walking and night pain, which sometimes radiates further down the leg. This condition can also affect young children, which may be linked to the presence of a virus.

  • Osteoarthritis in the Hip

    Osteoarthritis - Hip

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition resulting from wear and tear in the hip. The cartilage that covers the hip joint facilitates movement, so when this degenerates, mobility reduces while pain and stiffness increases. It is common in older people over the age of 50, especially women. Although there is no cure, there several things you can do to ease the pain and help slow down degeneration.

  • Pelvic Stress Fracture

    Pelvic Stress Fracture

    A pelvic stress fracture is a hairline type fracture in the large pelvis bone. This is due to repetitive impacts or forces, rather than one sudden impact or accident.

  • Hip Bursitis

    Hip Bursitis

    Hip bursitis, also known as Trochanteric bursitis is inflammation of a bursa or small sack of fluid between the tendon and bone. A bursa prevents friction and helps movement in the joint so when it becomes inflamed, it causes hip pain. Most cases of hip bursitis are caused from overuse and poor biomechanics, although a direct impact like a fall could also cause it. Read more on the causes, symptoms and treatment of this condition.

  • Perthes' Disease

    Perthes' Disease

    Perthes' disease affects children, most commonly aged between four and eight, but can also occasionally occur in younger children and teenagers. Tiredness and groin pain are two common smyptoms, and they may have a noticeable limp. Medical help is needed to diagnose this condition as early as possible to try to prevent and limit any future problems.

  • Iliopsoas Bursitis

    Iliopsoas bursitis is inflammation of the bursa which sits under the Iliopsoas muscle at the front of the hip. It is sometimes also called Iliopectineal bursitis.

  • Hip Tendonitis

    Hip tendonitis is inflammation of any one of a number of tendons in the hip although degeneration of the tendon is probably a more accurate description.

  • Hip Pain

    Hip pain or hip joint pain often develops gradually and can be from a number of causes. Labral tears and Osteoarthritis are more common, especially in older athletes who have been highly active in their 20's and 30's. Hip pain in children is often diagnosed as Perthe's disease. Here we list the causes of hip pain.

  • Groin Pain

    The most common cause of pain in the groin is an acute groin strain and this is frequently seen in twisting and turning sports such as American football, rugby, and soccer.  Whereas acute groin strains can take 2 to 3 weeks to recover, chronic groin injuries can take months if not years to clear up, often because there are several possible causes.