Aching knee

Aching knee can be from a bruise or haemotoma over the patellae. Knee bursitis can also cause aching. Osteoarthritis can also cause knees to ache. Bakers or popliteal cyst can also cause aching of the knee.

Patellae femoral issues can cause aching of the knee especially if doing activities that provoke the issue. Injuries that cause aching in the knee are listed below:
  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) also known as runners knee, chondromalacia patellae, anterior knee pain and patellofemoral joint syndrome is a generic term used to describe patella pain at the front of the knee. Here we explain the symptoms, causes, and treatment including patella taping and exercises.

  • Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers knee or patellar tendonitis is an overuse injury that results in pain at the front of the knee, localised at a point at the bottom of the kneecap. Repetitive strain from running or jumping causes inflammation or more likely degeneration of the patella tendon. Here we explain the treatment and important rehabilitation exercises required to return you back to full fitness.

  • Osgood Schlatters Disease

    Osgood Schlatters Disease

    Osgood Schlatter disease or Osgood Schlatter lesion is a very common cause of knee pain in children between the ages of 10 and 15 years old. It was named after two physicians in 1903, Dr. Robert Osgood and Dr. Carl Schlatter. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, especially rest, is essential as this injury can be stubborn to treat if left.

  • Chondromalacia Patella

    Chondromalacia Patella

    Chondromalacia patella (CMP) involves damage to the articular cartilage which is the smooth hard cartilage under the kneecap. Symptoms are similar to patellofemoral pain as the kneecap rubs on the bone underneath causing swelling and pain. Here we explain the injury as well as treatment, strapping and exercises.

  • Baker's Cyst

    Baker's Cyst

    A Baker's Cyst or Popliteal cyst is a prominent swelling at the back of the knee. It is usually caused by an underlying injury or condition in the knee joint but the athlete is often unaware of the exact cause. Here we explain the symptoms, causes and treatment options.

  • Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Iliotibial band syndrome is a common cause of pain on the outside of the knee caused by friction as the tendon rubs over the bone. It usually comes on gradually over time getting progressively worse until eventually, running must stop. Typically the athlete will rest for a period of time until symptoms go only for them to return so far into a run when training resumes.

  • Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Osteoarthritis - Knee

    Osteoarthritis or wear and tear on the knee joint is a common cause of knee pain. We explain the injury and treatment options.

  • Knee Synovitis

    Knee Synovitis

    Knee synovitis occurs when the synovial membrane which lines and lubricates the knee joint, becomes inflamed. Swelling or stiffness in the knee joint may develop following another injury or from arthritis or gout.

  • Quadriceps Tendinopathy

    Quadriceps tendonitis inflammation

    Overuse causes pain and inflammation of the quadriceps (thigh muscle) tendon to the point where it attaches to the top of the kneecap or patella. Over time this can lead to degeneration of the tendon. Here we explain the symptoms and causes as well as treatment and rehabilitation exercises.

  • Articular Cartilage Injury

    Articular cartilage injury

    Articular cartilage injury is damage to the tough, thin cartilage that lines the ends of bones. It is often caused by a collision or trauma to the knee or in conjunction with other knee joint injuries. Here explain the symptoms, causes, and treatment of an articular cartilage injury to the knee.

  • Patellofemoral Instability

    Patellofemoral Instability

    Patellofemoral instability usually involves the patient having a sensation of their kneecap 'slipping away' or feeling loose on a movement of the knee. It can occur through a number of anatomical or genetic causes, or it can result from a previous patella dislocation injury. Here we explain both primary and secondary instability.

  • Acute Knee Injuries

    An acute knee injury usually occurs suddenly through either trauma or a twisting action. Pain in the knee can vary in severity from very mild to very severe and this depends on the injury mechanism (how the injury occurred) and the forces involved during the impact. It is strongly advised not to carry on playing if you have acute knee pain as this can easily progress to a chronic pain or to more complex knee injuries.

  • Front Knee Pain (Anterior)

    Anterior knee pain is a pain at the front of the knee including the patella or kneecap. If you are not sure what is causing your knee injury is why not try our symptom checker? The two most common causes of pain at the front of the kneecap are patellofemoral pain and patella tendinitis or Jumpers knee. Sometimes it can be difficult to tell the two apart and occasionally they can occur simultaneously. Here we outline the causes of pain at the front of the knee as well as important conditions which can be missed.

  • Outside Knee Pain (Lateral)

    Lateral knee pain is that which occurs on the outside of the knee has come on gradually as opposed to an acute knee joint or ligament injury. If you are not sure what is causing your pain then why not check out our symptom checker? The most common causes of pain on the outside of the knee are Iliotibial band friction syndrome and Lateral cartilage injuries. Here we explain the most widely seen causes, less common causes of lateral knee pain as well as important injuries that should not be missed.