Gradual onset knee pain

Gradual onset of knee pain can occur due to an osteochondral defect (OCD) that is worsening. Gradual onset can become chronic pain in nature and osteoarthritis is a causing factor where the joint surfaces become damaged and both stiffness and pain occurs.

Patellae issues of mal alignment through stiffness or weakness of structures can also be pain of gradual onset. Tendonopathy issues through overuse or excessive load can be gradual pain in onset. Other injuries causing gradual onset of knee pain are listed below:
  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) also known as runners knee, chondromalacia patellae, anterior knee pain and patellofemoral joint syndrome is a generic term used to describe patella pain at the front of the knee. Here we explain the symptoms, causes and treatment including patella taping and exercises.

  • Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers knee or patellar tendonitis is an overuse injury that results in pain at the front of the knee, localised at a point at the bottom of the kneecap. Repetitive strain from running or jumping causes inflammation or more likely degeneration of the patella tendon. Here we explain the treatment and important rehabilitation exercises required to return you back to full fitness.

  • Osgood Schlatters Disease

    Osgood Schlatters Disease

    Osgood Schlatter disease or Osgood Schlatter lesion is a very common cause of knee pain in children between the ages of 10 and 15 years old. It was named after two physicians in 1903, Dr Robert Osgood and Dr. Carl Schlatter. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, especially rest, is essential as this injury can be stubborn to treat if left.

  • Chondromalacia Patella

    Chondromalacia Patella

    Chondromalacia patella (CMP) involves damage to the articular cartilage which is the smooth hard cartilage under the kneecap. Symptoms are similar to patellofemoral pain as the kneecap rubs on the bone underneath causing swelling and pain. Here we explain the injury as well as treatment, strapping and exercises.

  • Biceps Femoris Tendinopathy

    Biceps Femoris Tendinopathy

    Biceps femoris tendinopathy, sometimes called biceps femoris tendonitis is inflammation or more likely degeneraition of the tendon at the point where it inserts at the outside back of the knee. Here we explain the symptoms, causes and treatment as well as rehabilitation and exercises.

  • Baker's Cyst

    Baker's Cyst

    A Baker's Cyst or Popliteal cyst is a prominent swelling at the back of the knee. It is usually caused by an underlying injury or condition in the knee joint but the athlete is often unaware of the exact cause. Here we explain the symptoms, causes and treatment options.

  • Popliteus Injury

    Popliteus Injury

    The Popliteus is a small muscle located at the back of the knee joint. An injury or strain to the muscle or tendon can cause pain at the back of the knee. This knee injury can occur gradually through overuse, or can result from a sudden twisting, fall or collision.

  • Gastrocnemius Tendinopathy

    Gastrocnemius Tendinopathy

    Gastrocnemius tendinopathy or tendinitis is inflammation or degeneration of the tendon of the calf muscle causing pain at the back of the knee. This is an overuse injury which is more common in runners and sprinters. Treatment involves reducing the pain and inflammation followed by a full rehabilitation and exercise program to restore the muscle and tendon to full function.

  • Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Iliotibial band syndrome is a common cause of pain on the outside of the knee caused by friction as the tendon rubs over the bone. It usually comes on gradually over time getting progressively worse until eventually running must stop. Typically the athlete will rest for a period of time until symptoms go only for them to return so far into a run when training resumes.

  • Lateral Meniscus Tear

    Lateral Meniscus Tear

    Lateral meniscus tear is an injury to the semi circular cartilage on the outside of the knee joint. Symptoms include tenderness and pain around the outside surface of the knee. Each knee joint has two crescent shaped cartilage menisci which cushion and support the knee. They can be injured by twisting or traumatic injury as well as degenerating over time.

  • Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Osteoarthritis - Knee

    Osteoarthritis or wear and tear on the knee joint is a common cause of knee pain. We explain the injury and treatment options.

  • Knee Synovitis

    Knee Synovitis

    Knee synovitis occurs when the synovial membrane which lines and lubricates the knee joint, becomes inflamed. Swelling or stiffness in the knee joint may develop following another injury or from arthritis or gout.

  • Synovial Plica Irritation

    Synovial Plica Irritation

    The synovial plica is a synovial fold found along the inside of the knee cap causing pain and discomfort. It is sometimes be confused or misdiagnosed as patellofemoral pain syndrome as the symptoms can be similar.

  • Pes Anserine Tendinopathy - Bursitis

    Pes Anserine  - Bursitis

    Pes anserine tendonitis is inflammation of a tendon on the inside of the knee. A bursa or small fluid sac can also become inflamed causing pain.

  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    This injury occurs when there is a fracture at the neck or top of the thigh bone. It is more common in boys aged 11 to 16 years old and occurs gradually over a period of time.

  • Perthes' Disease

    Perthes' Disease

    Perthes' disease affects children, most commonly aged between four and eight, but can also occasionally occur in younger children and teenagers.

  • Housemaids Knee

    Housemaids Knee

    Housemaids Knee also known as prepatellar bursitis or knee bursitis is a swelling of the bursa or small sack of fluid at the front of the knee. It can be acute or sudden onset or chronic where it occurs gradually over time. Here we explain injury in more detail the treatment options available.

  • Fat Pad Impingement

    The infrapatella fat pad is also sometimes known as Hoffa's pad. It is a soft tissue that lies beneath the kneecap which can get impinged causing knee pain.

  • Quadriceps Tendinopathy

    Quadriceps tendonitis inflammation

    Overuse causes pain and inflammation of the quadriceps (thigh muscle) tendon it the point where it attaches to the top of the kneecap or patella. Over time this can lead to degeneration of the tendon. Here we explain the symptoms and causes as well as treatment and rehabilitation exercises.

  • Infrapatella Bursitis

    A bursa is a small sac of fluid whose function is to lubricate the movement between tendons and bone. There are a number of them around the knee which can become painful and inflamed.