Local knee swelling

Local swelling on the knee means swelling at a particular point around the knee rather than a general swelling in the knee joint. This can be at the front of the knee in cases of patella tendinopathy (jumpers knee), osgood schlatters disease or sinding-larsen-johansson lesion. Swelling on the inside of the knee occurs with medial ligament or cartilage injuries.

 

 

  • Medial Meniscus Tear

    Medial Meniscus Tear

    A torn meniscus is a tear of the semi-circular cartilage in the knee joint causing pain on the inside of the knee. It is commonly injured through direct impact in contact sports or twisting but can also occur in older athletes through gradual degeneration. Treatment depends on how bad the injury is and may require surgery.

  • Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers knee or patellar tendonitis is an overuse injury that results in pain at the front of the knee, localised at a point at the bottom of the kneecap. Repetitive strain from running or jumping causes inflammation or more likely degeneration of the patella tendon. Here we explain the treatment and important rehabilitation exercises required to return you back to full fitness.

  • Osgood Schlatters Disease

    Osgood Schlatters Disease

    Osgood Schlatter disease or Osgood Schlatter lesion is a very common cause of knee pain in children between the ages of 10 and 15 years old. It was named after two physicians in 1903, Dr. Robert Osgood and Dr. Carl Schlatter. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, especially rest, is essential as this injury can be stubborn to treat if left.

  • Biceps Femoris Tendinopathy

    Biceps Femoris Tendinopathy

    Biceps femoris tendinopathy, sometimes called biceps femoris tendonitis is inflammation or more likely degeneration of the tendon at the point where it inserts at the outside back of the knee. Here we explain the symptoms, causes, and treatment as well as rehabilitation and exercises.

  • Baker's Cyst

    Baker's Cyst

    A Baker's Cyst or Popliteal cyst is a prominent swelling at the back of the knee. It is usually caused by an underlying injury or condition in the knee joint but the athlete is often unaware of the exact cause. Here we explain the symptoms, causes and treatment options.

  • Gastrocnemius Tendinopathy

    Gastrocnemius Tendinopathy

    Gastrocnemius tendinopathy or tendinitis is inflammation or degeneration of the tendon of the calf muscle causing pain at the back of the knee. This is an overuse injury which is more common in runners and sprinters. Treatment involves reducing the pain and inflammation followed by a full rehabilitation and exercise program to restore the muscle and tendon to full function.

  • Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Iliotibial band syndrome is a common cause of pain on the outside of the knee caused by friction as the tendon rubs over the bone. It usually comes on gradually over time getting progressively worse until eventually, running must stop. Typically the athlete will rest for a period of time until symptoms go only for them to return so far into a run when training resumes.

  • Lateral Meniscus Tear

    Lateral Meniscus Tear

    A lateral meniscus tear is an injury to the semi-circular cartilage on the outside of the knee joint. Symptoms include tenderness and pain around the outside surface of the knee. Each knee joint has two crescent-shaped cartilage menisci which cushion and support the knee. They can be injured by twisting or a traumatic injury as well as degenerating over time.

  • Pes Anserine Tendinopathy - Bursitis

    Pes Anserine  - Bursitis

    Pes anserine tendonitis is inflammation of a tendon on the inside of the knee. A bursa or small fluid sac can also become inflamed causing pain.

  • Housemaids Knee

    Housemaids Knee

    Housemaids Knee also known as prepatellar bursitis or knee bursitis is a swelling of the bursa or small sack of fluid at the front of the knee. It can be acute or sudden onset or chronic where it occurs gradually over time. Here we explain injury in more detail the treatment options available.

  • Fat Pad Impingement

    The infrapatellar fat pad is also sometimes known as Hoffa's pad. It is a soft tissue that lies beneath the kneecap which can get impinged causing knee pain.

  • Quadriceps Tendinopathy

    Quadriceps tendonitis inflammation

    Overuse causes pain and inflammation of the quadriceps (thigh muscle) tendon to the point where it attaches to the top of the kneecap or patella. Over time this can lead to degeneration of the tendon. Here we explain the symptoms and causes as well as treatment and rehabilitation exercises.

  • Infrapatella Bursitis

    A bursa is a small sac of fluid whose function is to lubricate the movement between tendons and bone. There are a number of them around the knee which can become painful and inflamed.

  • Posterolateral Corner Injury

    Posterolateral Corner Injury

    Posterolateral corner injuries cause pain at the back and outside of the knee. They are not particularly common injuries, although around half of cases occur due to sporting injuries, with road traffic accidents being another common cause.

  • Tennis Leg

    Tennis Leg

    Tennis leg is a general term used to describe pain in the leg caused by a tear of the inner head of the big calf muscle, the plantaris muscle or sometimes both. Here we explain the treatment including immediate first aid as well as rehabilitation exercises essential for optimum recovery.

  • Patella Tendon Rupture

    Patella Tendon Rupture

    The patella tendon connects the kneecap to the shin bone. A partial rupture of this tendon is often from a jumping or explosive load on the tendon.

  • Hamstring Tendon Rupture

    Hamstring - Rupture

    A full or partial rupture of the hamstring muscle tendons can occur at the point where they insert into the back of the knee. Sudden sharp pain may be felt at the time of injury with possible swelling and soreness. Here we explain how the injury occurs as well as treatment, rehabilitation and exercises to return you back to full fitness.

  • Biceps Femoris Tendon Avulsion

    Biceps Femoris - Avulsion

    A biceps femoris avulsion strain or fracture occurs when the tendon comes away from the bone, taking a small fragment of bone with it causing pain and swelling at the outside back of the knee. It may often be misdiagnosed as a simple tendon injury and may require a much longer period of recovery.

  • Acute Knee Injuries

    An acute knee injury usually occurs suddenly through either trauma or a twisting action. Pain in the knee can vary in severity from very mild to very severe and this depends on the injury mechanism (how the injury occurred) and the forces involved during the impact. It is strongly advised not to carry on playing if you have acute knee pain as this can easily progress to a chronic pain or to more complex knee injuries.

  • Front Knee Pain (Anterior)

    Anterior knee pain is a pain at the front of the knee including the patella or kneecap. If you are not sure what is causing your knee injury is why not try our symptom checker? The two most common causes of pain at the front of the kneecap are patellofemoral pain and patella tendinitis or Jumpers knee. Sometimes it can be difficult to tell the two apart and occasionally they can occur simultaneously. Here we outline the causes of pain at the front of the knee as well as important conditions which can be missed.