Hand & Finger stiffness

Stiffness in the finger joints or difficulty moving the fingers. Restricted range of movement in the finger joints is a sign of an inflammatory issue, which can be through injury to the finger joint, tendons or from arthritis. Finger stiffness can also be due to swelling of the hand or wrists where this as had an effect more distally on movement of the hand and fingers.

Contractures can also cause hand and finger stiffness and are common within these structures such as dupuytren’s. Fractures, sprains, dislocations and scarring can all be associated with stiffness of the hands and fingers, which can also have pain present. Injuries with this symptom are listed below:
  • Metacarpal Fracture

    Metacarpal Fracture

    The metacarpal bones are the five long bones in the hand. Any of these bones can be broken or fractured but the 1st metacarpal under the base of the thumb is the most commonly injured. The fracture is usually caused by a direct impact which causes pain in the area. Treatment for these kinds of fractures usually involves immobilisation in a cast followed by strengthening exercises.

  • Bruised Hand

    Bruised Hand

    A bruised hand, also known as a hand contusion, occurs due to a direct trauma of the hand. Impacts and crush injuries are the most common causes. This hand injury usually results in bleeding and subsequent bruising, and will be painful to touch. Rest and ice are two of the main ways to help this injury.

  • Sprained Finger

    Sprained Finger

    A sprained finger occurs when the finger is bent in some way causing damage to the ligaments which connect bones together. It is a common injury in ball games such as American football, basketball, cricket and handball. A sprain can be helped by rest, ice and compression and also a taping method, details of which can be seen below.

  • Trigger Finger & Trigger Thumb

    Trigger Finger

    Trigger Finger is a form of tenosynovitis which results in the finger becoming bent in towards the palm of the hand. This can also occur in the thumb known as trigger thumb. There is no specific cause but a variety of factors are detailed below which can make the condition more likely, including gaming and texting! The treatment depends on the severity of the condition and can range from resting to surgery.

  • Mallet Finger

    Mallet Finger

    This finger injury makes you unable to extend or straighten the end joint of a finger without assistance. It can happen from sports and other daily activities and causes pain and tenderness to the area. The severity of the injury can vary from a stretching of the tendon to the tendon coming unattached from the bone.

  • Boutonniere Deformity

    Boutonniere Deformity

    A boutonniere deformity or buttonhole deformity is an injury to a tendon in one of the fingers, resulting in a deformed shape. This usually occurs after an impact to a bent finger. See below for more on the causes, symptoms and treatments of Boutonniere deformity.

  • Broken Finger

    Broken Finger

    A broken finger is a break or fracture in any one of the 3 small phalange bones which make up each finger.

  • Dislocated Finger

    Dislocated Finger

    A dislocated finger occurs when two of the finger bones forming joints become displaced, injuring the ligaments and other soft tissue in the process. The finger will look deformed and severe pain will be felt. Medical help should be sought immediately, especailly as there can be complications involving nerves and ligaments.

  • Volar Plate Injury

    Volar Plate Injury

    The volar plate is a very thick ligament which joins two bones in the finger. A volar plate injury occurs when the finger is bent too far back the wrong way, spraining or tearing the ligament. In some cases this finger injury can also involve a fracture. Read more on volar plate injury and how to treat it here.

  • Hand & Finger Injuries

    Injuries to the hand and fingers are common in sports and must be taken seriously. Injuries in this area can be very debilitating and if treated incorrectly they can have long-term consequences in terms of hand and finger function.