Inside wrist pain

Pain on the inside of the wrist or medial wrist pain when in an anatomical position or palm facing up and pain on the inside of the wrist or the little finger side of the wrist. This is also the side of the wrist, which attaches to the ulna bone in the forearm.

Pain on the medial side can be from ligament, tendon or bone injuries and can be sharp or dull and can also be created through movement. Inside wrist pain can also be referred from higher up in the body. Injuries with this symptom are listed below:
  • Bennett Fracture

    Bennett Fracture

    A Bennett fracture is an injury to the base of the thumb joint, which is usually caused by a hard impact or trauma such as punching something hard or falling onto the hand with the thumb sticking out to the side. There will be swelling and considerable wrist pain located near the thumb. It is a serious wrist injury and will require surgery to avoid long-term complications.

  • Smith's Fracture

    Smiths Fracture

    A Smith's fracture is a break at the end of the radius bone, at the wrist and is often caused by a sudden impact. The fragment of fractured bone is displaced forwards to the palm side of the wrist, which causes swelling and pain to the area. You should try not to move the injured wrist afterwards, and medical help is needed as soon as possible to treat the fracture.

  • De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    De Quervain's Tenosynovitis is inflammation of the synovium or sheath that surrounds two tendons in the wrist which attach to the base of the thumb. It is a form of repetitive strain injury which can be exacerbated by sporting and work activities. The inflammation can cause pain and restrict movement in the wrist, but in most cases it can be treated without surgery.

  • Acute Wrist Injuries

    Sudden onset injuries are called acute injuries and are usually caused by a fall onto the hand with an outstretched arm or a forced twisting movement. Damage can occur to the bones, ligaments (connect bone to bone) or tendons (connect muscle to bone) in the wrist. In the first 72 hours, the first aid principles of P.R.I.C.E. are advised including protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If a broken bone (fracture) is suspected, then always seek medical advice immediately.

  • Gradual Onset Wrist Pain

    Gradual onset injuries or chronic injuries occur over a period of time and often cannot be traced back to a single incident or cause. The most common structure injured are the tendons of the wrist through overuse or repetitive strain.