Outside wrist pain

Pain on the outside of the wrist or the little finger / pinky finger side of the wrist. This is also the side of the wrist which attaches to the ulna bone in the forearm.

Pain on the radius or thumb side of the wrist joint can be from tendons, ligaments or bone and a common site of pain is a fractured scaphoid which can be swollen in the ‘snuff box’ area. Referred pain can also be burning and tingling on the outside of the wrist. Injuries with this symptom are listed below:
  • Hook of Hamate Fracture

    Hook of Hamate Fracture

    The wrist contains a number of small bones called carpals. The hamate is a carpal bone on the outside (little finger side) of the wrist. It has a hook-shaped part which protrudes outwards and can under certain circumstances be fractured. With this injury, wrist pain occurs on the side of the little finger and the strength of grip can be reduced.

  • TFCC Tear

    TFCC Tear

    A TFCC tear is an injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex, found in the wrist, between the end of the ulna bone and the carpals. A tear can be caused by a specific incident or come on gradually, resulting in wrist pain and restricted wrist and hand function. This wrist injury can often be treated with a splint, although if it is too severe, surgery may be needed.

  • Triquetrum Fracture

    Triquetrum Fracture

    A Triquetral Fracture is a break of the Triquetral bone (sometimes called triquetrum) is one of the eight small carpal bones in the wrist. The Triquetral is the second most commonly fractured carpal, behind the Scaphoid. A sudden, direct impact is the most common cause of this fracture, which causes wrist pain on the side of the little finger. This fracture can also often occur alongside other wrist injuries.

  • Acute Wrist Injuries

    Sudden onset injuries are called acute injuries and are usually caused by a fall onto the hand with an outstretched arm or a forced twisting movement. Damage can occur to the bones, ligaments (connect bone to bone) or tendons (connect muscle to bone) in the wrist. In the first 72 hours, the first aid principles of P.R.I.C.E. are advised including protection, rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If a broken bone (fracture) is suspected, then always seek medical advice immediately.