Sports Injury Blog Articles

sports drink

No, not alcohol! Water. Dehydration can have a detrimental effect on performance so regularly drinking water is essential. Staying hydrated enables people to perform at their best by aiding concentration and reducing fatigue, and so can minimise injury risk. The amount you need to drink is individual and will depend on your sweat rates, the activity, length of time of activity and the weather.

Hot Tub Blog

Hot tubs or Jacuzzis have physical and mental benefits which can improve overall health. They are accessible in most spas, gyms, and hotels but are now becoming more and more popular at home. Some hot tub health benefits include reducing muscle and joint pain, aiding recovery in sports and helping improve performance. Here are six reasons to justify buying one.

Prevent shin pain

Medial tibial stress syndrome, more widely known as shin splints, is the most common cause of shin pain. Although shin pain is often caused and exacerbated by too much running and jumping, there are a number of ways to reduce the risk of it occurring. Here are our top 10 tips for preventing shin splints!

Plantar Fasciitis Intro

The internet is full of magic cures, the latest inventions or secret tricks to cure Plantar Fasciitis. Here are 10 tried and tested ways from Sports Injury Clinic and recommended by elite level sports injury professionals to help cure Plantar Fasciitis.

Athletes foot home remedies

Athlete’s foot (Tinea Pedis) is a fungal infection. It can itch, burn, sting and make redness appear around the feet. It is a common issue and is contagious in swimming pools, locker rooms and in some health clubs or changing rooms, so wearing footwear in these areas is advised. Contact with wet floors, shoes, and socks can spread the infection. Here are some ways to help cure athlete's foot at home.

Avoiding the Flu

People often ask, what’s the difference between the common cold and the flu? How can I avoid getting ill before an important competition or exam like everyone around me? Is it as simple as not going outside in the cold with wet hair? Here we give our top tips for avoiding the flu.

Top tips for avoiding running injuries

It’s that time of year again where many people set New Year’s resolutions that often include losing weight or getting fit. Many try their hand at running, which is an excellent free exercise (well, almost free anyway) and can be a great way to improve fitness. Here is our guide to help you avoid running injuries and stay injury free.

5 Injuries Women

There are some obvious differences between men and women and some of these differences can lead to an increased risk of injury. Here we explain our top five most common sports injuries for women and why they affect women more than men. We also look at what you can do to try to prevent them.

Achilles tendon rupture risk

A complete tear or rupture to the Achilles tendon at the back of the lower leg is a rare but serious injury requiring urgent surgery followed by months of careful rehabilitation. Many athletes have recovered from such a serious injury and gone on to do amazing things but prevention is always the best cure.

Could you spot Concussion

Have I or someone else got Concussion? – How to tell pitch side if you or someone else needs to stop playing. A concussion is a traumatic brain injury and should not be ignored. It happens in many sports and can be from a contact or non-contact injury and is typically from rotational or linear forces transmitted to the brain.

Vibration Training

Whole body vibration (WBV) training has become a popular method of training over the last few years, thanks in part at least to the endorsement of numerous high profile celebrities (Madonna and Elle MacPherson to name just two!) and extensive media coverage. But what exactly is WBV training, how does it work and does it really work?

Signs of depression in athletes

Mental health issues within all sports are important to address. Like a person's physical attributes, mental health alters throughout life. Recognising a mental illness, such as depression, in athletes is of utmost importance. 1 in 4 people in the U.K can be affected by mental health issues such as depression or anxiety so educating athletes and coaches about its effects is vital. Athletes are no different to anyone else and the pressure of media, peers, success, competing, training and winning can all contribute to a depressive state.

Sleep and sports training

There are many reasons why sleep is important, as it improves overall health and wellbeing and enables individuals to perform. It helps our brain to function and affects many different systems within our body from our emotional state to our physical state. The amount of sleep we require depends on what stage of life we are at, with a newborn requiring approximately 16 hours a day and an adult requiring around 7 hours a day.

Sports drinks explained

Carbohydrate (CHO) is important as an exercise fuel. Having enough fuel to supply the body is essential to be able to perform optimally and combat fatigue or tiredness, which could lead to injuries. Sources of carbohydrates can be found from solids and liquids. In some cases, we need to have more than just plain water to help us exercise, concentrate or perform optimally. Sports drinks, sports gels or juices can help us achieve this.

Avoid Ingrown Toenail

Ingrown toenail or onychocryptosis is when the toenail grows into the nail fold. These can be extremely painful and can develop redness and an infection. It can stop people playing sport and can mean a visit to the podiatrist. To prevent the problem there are several measures that can be taken:

sports bra

A good, comfortable sports bra is a vital piece of a ladies sports kit. Not wearing one can lead to irreversible damage to the breasts. Research from Shock Absorber and the University of Portsmouth has demonstrated that wearing a sports bra reduces breast movement (bouncing) by a massive 74%! So how should a sports bra fit and how do you find the perfect one?

Return to Fitness

In spite of our best intentions, a vacation often sees us stray from the fitness and training regime we follow at home. Relaxing on the beach, savouring indulgent dinners and drinks and enjoying the local nightlife are the pleasures that make a break so joyful. However, after taking a break from working out, how do we return to our training schedule and regain fitness after an indulgent fortnight?

Warm Up & Cool Down

It is important to warm up prior to exercise and cool down after. The main two reasons for this are to improve performance and to decrease the risk of injury. Good warm-up exercises will increase the temperature of muscles which work better at a temperature of 40 degrees. Cooling down after exercise is important to help muscles recover and avoid injury.

Warrior One Pose

The extensive benefits of yoga are well publicised in modern media, and it has become a firm mainstay of Western culture. However for those who have never practiced yoga before, highly effective poses that are particularly beneficial to the needs of athletes are easily accessible, and can make an effective addition to a post-training muscle-recovery protocol. This Warrior pose benefits the upper and lower body and is simple to perform.

Hip traction

Traction of the hip is often used as part of therapy used by a number of different therapists so I was keen to see if regular use at home made a difference. As a 45-year-old long-term hip pain sufferer, I was recently asked by former sprinter Mark Dunwell to try the HipTrac leg traction device.