Field Hockey Injuries

Field Hockey Injuries

Field hockey injuries are similar to other field sports such as soccer due to the sudden bursts of speed and changes of direction. Hardball and sticks increase the likelihood of contusions and lacerations.

Most common Field Hockey injuries

Hamstring strain

Hamstring strain (pulled hamstring) is a tear of one of the hamstring muscles at the back of the thigh. Strains are graded 1, 2 or 3 depending on how bad they are. A grade 1 injury may only be a slight twinge whilst a grade 3 can result in the athlete being unable to walk with swelling and bruising developing soon after.

Read more on hamstring strain.


Ankle Sprains

A sprained ankle is one of the most common sports injuries and Field Hockey players are no exception. In the majority of cases, the ankle rolls inwards (inversion) under the weight of the rest of the body, resulting in damage to the ligaments on the outside of the ankle.

Read more on treatment for ankle sprains.


Metatarsal fracture

A metatarsal fracture is a break to one of the five long metatarsal bones in the foot and is usually caused by a direct impact or trauma. Symptoms include acute and severe foot pain at the time of injury. There will likely be rapid swelling and the athlete will be unable to weight bear. A visible deformity in the foot may be noticed and bruising will usually develop within 24 hours.

Read more on Metatarsal fractures


Contusions

Contusion occur in a muscle when there has been a direct impact. The most common site for a contusion is a quadriceps muscle contusion, which is sometimes then referred to as a ‘charley horse’ or a ‘dead leg’. Contusions can occur in any muscle, with the hamstrings and calf muscles being other common locations.

Read more on causes and treatment for contusions.


Back pain

Back pain – Back pain can be acute (sudden onset back pain) or chronic back pain (gradual onset or persistent) It can be difficult to diagnose due to the complexity and the number of structures and tissues in the lower back that can cause pain. Pain radiating down the leg is known as Sciatica.

Read more on the prevention and treatment of back pain.


Groin strain

A groin strain is a tear or rupture to any one of the adductor muscles resulting in pain in the inner thigh. Groin injuries can range from very mild to very severe injuries that are completely debilitating. Initial treatment involves protection, rest, ice and compression during the early acute stage followed by a thorough rehabilitation and strengthening program.

Read more on treatment for groin strain.


Cartilage meniscus injury

A torn meniscus is a tear to the semi-circular cartilage in the knee joint causing pain on the inside of the knee. It is commonly injured through direct impact in contact sports or twisting but can also occur in older athletes through gradual degeneration. Treatment depends on how bad the injury is and may require surgery. Symptoms include pain on the inside of the knee which may be of sudden onset but can also occur gradually.

Read more on meniscus injury.


Should I seek professional treatment?

If you have any of the following symptoms you should seek further medical assistance.

  • Severe pain, especially on walking
  • Severe swelling (oedema)
  • Altered sensation in the foot – such as a feeling of “pins and needles” (paresthesia) or a “loss of feeling” (anaesthesia).
  • Unable to complete normal daily activities after the initial 72 hours.

Further medical assistance can be sought through either your local GP or a private clinician such as a podiatrist, physiotherapist, sports therapist, osteopath or chiropractor. If you have followed the P.R.I.C.E. principles (see below) and are still unable to walk after 72 hours or still have severe pain that is not subsiding after the first 72 hours you should visit your local A&E department for further assessment.

Secondly, if you have applied for P.R.I.C.E. principles and still have weakness that lasts a long time (more than 2 weeks) or have ongoing discomfort in your foot or heel, you are highly recommended to seek advice from a specialist expert – such as a podiatrist or physiotherapist, osteopath, or chiropractor – who can provide you with advice and an appropriate and effective recovery and rehabilitation program.


Immediate first aid for acute Field Hockey injuries

The PRICE principles are the gold standard set for treating acute sports injuries. The acronym stands for Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation and should be applied as early as possible and continued for at least the first 24-72 hours.

Read more on PRICE principles


Preventing Field Hockey Injuries

Injury prevention strategies are very similar in most sports, although variations relating to protective equipment and conditioning will be present. the following is a simple guide to help you to avoid injury:

Warm-up

A warm-up is a vital part of injury prevention in every sport. It also helps to prepare you mentally and physically. Warm-ups should get the heart rate up to increase the flow of blood around the body, in preparation for more strenuous activity. It should also warm and stretch the muscles to ensure they are working to their optimum and do not sustain an injury due to being cold and inflexible.

A warm-up should consist of a minimum of 5 minutes of cardio, pulse-raising exercise such as jogging, cycling, skipping, etc. This should be followed by dynamic stretches. These have more recently replaced the use of static stretches. They include drills such as running with high knees, heels to bum and Cariocas. This should be performed for a minimum of 5 minutes, up to a maximum of 20 minutes, with movements gradually becoming larger and faster. This is preferable to static stretching as it keeps the body warmer and heart rate higher, and more resembles the type of movements which are required in most sports.

Protection

It is important that hockey players wear protective equipment to avoid certain injuries. Shin pads and mouth guards are commonly worn by most outfield players. When playing on astroturf pitches, may players will also opt to use a glove, to stop abrasions to the knuckles when stopping the ball close to the ground. The goalkeeper wears a lot more protective equipment, including leg pads, chest pad and Helmut with faceguard. Faceguards are now more commonly being worn by outfield players when defending penalty corners, as this is the most dangerous part of play for a defender.

Rest

Resting is an important part of any athletes training program! Physiological changes in the cardiovascular, respiratory, and muscular systems in our bodies, occur when we are at rest. Overtraining often results in injuries due to fatigue causing poor technique and overuse type injuries. If you feel at all unwell, tired or in pain, you should rest until better.

Training

In order to play in the higher levels of any sport, training is vitally important. Training not only the cardiovascular and muscular systems but also techniques and tactics are required to make sure the body is strong, coordinated and flexible as well as the mind is prepared and focused to name but a few.

Nutrition and Hydration

Proper nutrition is important. A bad diet will prevent you from recovering from training sessions making you more prone to injury. A balanced diet is what you should aim for:

  • Carbohydrate is important for refueling muscles
  • Protein rebuilds muscles
  • If you become dehydrated then less blood will flow through muscles. The muscles will be more prone to injury
  • Vitamins and minerals are required for a number of reasons related to recovery

Much of what is discussed above should be part of your sporting routine. A biomechanical analysis can help identify possible injury risks. Orthotic devices can help. Also, an assessment from a sports therapist or specialist can identify weak areas and possible injury risks. A course of exercises specific to your needs can give you the best chance of avoiding injury.

This article has been written with reference to the bibliography.

About The Author