Kneecap pain

Kneecap pain includes tenderness when pressing on, around or below the kneecap. Point tenderness just at the bottom of the patella (kneecap) can be jumpers knee or sinding-larson-johansson lesion (usually in teens). Slightly lower down on the shinbone where there is a prominent lump (tibial tubercle) is likely to be osgood schlatters disease.

Tenderness on the edges, usually inside edge could indicate patellofemoral pain and tenderness along the top could be from quadriceps tendon inflammation or degeneration. Pain in kneecap could also indicate a biomechanical problem. Pain behind kneecap, pain under kneecap, sharp pain in kneecap, pain above kneecap. Injuries that cause pain in kneecap are listed below:
  • Patella Dislocation

    Patella Dislocation

    The patella can dislocate outside of its normal position, usually round the outside of the knee. It can also partially dislocate, called a subluxation.

  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) also known as runners knee, chondromalacia patellae, anterior knee pain and patellofemoral joint syndrome is a generic term used to describe patella pain at the front of the knee.

  • Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers Knee

    Jumpers knee or patellar tendonitis is an overuse injury that results in pain at the front of the knee, localised at a point towards the bottom of the kneecap. Repetitive strain from too much running or jumping causes inflammation or degeneration of the patella tendon.

  • Chondromalacia Patella

    Chondromalacia Patella

    Chondromalacia patella (CMP) involves damage to the articular cartilage which is the smooth hard cartilage under the kneecap.

  • Synovial Plica Irritation

    Synovial Plica Irritation

    The synovial plica is a synovial fold found along the inside of the knee cap causing pain and discomfort. It is sometimes be confused or misdiagnosed as patellofemoral pain syndrome as the symptoms can be similar.

  • Housemaids Knee

    Housemaids Knee

    Housemaids Knee also known as prepatellar bursitis or knee bursitis is a swelling of the bursa or small sack of fluid at the front of the knee.

  • Quadriceps Tendinopathy

    Overuse can cause pain and inflammation of the quadriceps tendon as it inserts into the top of the kneecap. Over time this can lead to degeneration of the tendon.

  • Infrapatella Bursitis

    A bursa is a small sac of fluid who's function is to lubricate the movement between tendons and bone. There are a number of them around the knee which can become painful and inflamed.

  • Acute Patella Injury

    Acute Patella Injury

    An acute patella injury is an injury to the kneecap or patella from a direct blow or fall onto the knee. A fracture of the patella is also possible.

  • Patellofemoral Instability

    Patellofemoral Instability

    Patellofemoral instability usually involves the patient having a sensation of their kneecap 'slipping away' or feeling loose on movement of the knee.

  • Acute Knee Injuries

    An acute knee injury usually occurs suddenly through either trauma or a twisting action. Pain in the knee can vary in severity from very mild to very severe and this depends on the injury mechanism (how the injury occurred) and the forces involved during the impact. It is strongly advised not to carry on playing if you have acute knee pain as this can easily progress to a chronic pain or to more complex knee injuries.

  • Front Knee Pain (Anterior)

    Anterior knee pain is pain at the front of the knee including the patella or kneecap. If you are not sure what is causing your knee injury is why not try our symptom checker? The two most common causes of pain at the front of the kneecap are patellofemoral pain and patella tendinitis or Jumpers knee. Sometimes it can be difficult to tell the two apart and occasionally they can occur simultaneusly. Here we outline the causes of pain at the front of the knee as well as important conditions which can be missed.

  • Inside Knee Pain (Medial)

    Medial knee pain is pain on the inside of the knee which usually comes on gradually as opposed to a sudden acute knee injury. If you are not sure what your injury is then why not try our symptom checker? Pain on the inside of the knee is usually an acute injury caused by a sudden trauma, however it can come on gradually over time with poor biomechanics and overuse. Below we outline the most common medial knee injuries as well as some of the less common causes and important conditions which should not be missed.