Gradual onset shoulder pain

Shoulder Subluxation

Shoulder Subluxation

Shoulder subluxation or shoulder instability occurs when the shoulder partially dislocates. By its nature, the shoulder joint allows a large range of movement which means it is likely to be less stable than other joints, such as the hip. There are several reasons why the shoulder joint may be unstable and dislocate which are described below. Medical help from a physiotherapist will help as they can give exercises to help strengthen and stabilize the area.

Clavicle Muscle Attachments Inflammation

Clavicle Attachments Inflammation

The Clavicle, or collarbone, has a number of muscle attachments along its length. The tendons that attach the muscles to the front of the shoulder and collarbone can become painful and inflamed through overuse. This injury is particularly found in athletes who do a lot of throwing, such as cricketers. Read more on the symptoms and the treatments of this injury below.

Suprascapular Neuropathy

Suprascapular Neuropathy

Suprascapular neuropathy usually occurs as a result of traction damage to the suprascapular nerve, causing an aching or burning pain at the back and or side of the shoulder joint. This nerve can become damaged in sports that use overhead arm actions like cricket and tennis. Resting from these aggravating activities is the main way to help ease the shoulder pain, with strengthening exercises helping to treat the causes of the injury.

Referred Shoulder Pain

Referred Shoulder Pain

Pain in the shoulder can be referred to or caused by, a problem in another area of the body such as the neck or spine. Pressure on nerves from various causes can result in pain being transmitted into the shoulder. General pain in the arm, shoulder, neck and chest areas can indicate a referred pain and should be checked out by a doctor to find any underlying causes. Read more on referred shoulder pain here.

Pec Major Tendon Inflammation

Pec Major - inflammation

The Pectoralis Major tendon is weakest where it inserts into the arm or humerus bone. Common sports that can inflame the tendon include racket sports, rowing, swimming and weight training, and the pain when performing these activities will probably have increased over a period of time. Resting from these sports is essential to recovering from this shoulder injury. Read more on the symptoms and treatments below.

Subacromial bursitis

Subacromial Bursitis

Subacromial Bursitis

Subacromial bursitis has similar symptoms to Supraspinatus tendinitis, with shoulder pain over a 60-degree arc when the arm is lifted sideways. The subacromial bursa is a sack of fluid over the tendon which helps facilitate movement. This can become trapped, especially in sports where the arm is regularly at or above shoulder level. Resting from these activities helps stop the pain, and once pain-free, you can start doing rehabilitation exercises.

Shoulder Tendonitis

Shoulder Tendonitis

Shoulder Tendonitis or Tenosynovitis is a degenerative condition of any of the tendons surrounding the shoulder joint. This is usually the rotator cuff tendons but it can also occur in the biceps and triceps tendons. The shoulder pain usually comes on gradually and is due to repetitive movements and overuse. It is common in those with poor posture and those who use the joint a lot, like athletes who throw and manual workers.

Winged scapula

Winged Scapula

Winged Scapula

A winged scapula is a symptom of another condition, rather than an injury itself. It is where the shoulder blade protrudes out on the back, rather than laying flat against the back of the chest wall, and this can be painful. It can be linked to poor posture, which is quite common with many people sitting at desks all day! Read more for treatments and exercises to help ease and prevent this shoulder pain.